Writer-director Maureen Huskey’s play based on the life and work of James Tiptree Jr. premieres in Los Angeles, October 27, 2018. “Dodging in and out of reality, the play investigates gender, longing and creativity as self-exploration through one of the science fiction world’s greatest literary tricksters.” This play has been in the works for some […]

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On June 13 in Portland, OR, Literary Arts brought a terrific lineup of writers together to speak about Ursula Le Guin’s life and work. The evening included family photos, clips from Arwen Curry’s documentary Worlds of Ursula K. Le Guin, and a dragon at the end. The speakers remembered Ursula the teacher, builder of bridges, […]

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The narrator of Sheila Heti’s new novel Motherhood is in an agony of doubt. She’s in her late thirties. Does she or doesn’t she want a child? Why can’t she make this life decision? When she thinks of having a baby she balks. She’s afraid of giving up her freedom, and besides, how could she […]

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In The Village Voice I wrote about another aspect of Ursula, not the homebody but the writer and thinker ahead of her time. Before Ursula K. Le Guin, who died last week at age 88, goes to dwell among the stars — maybe near the constellation that bears her name — it’s worth remembering how […]

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“How should we remember Ursula Kroeber Le Guin? Together,” Nisi Shawl writes. Like many others of Ursula’s friends and readers after her death, I wanted to honor her memory. I don’t think I’d ever worked and written as hard as I did that week, but I wanted to do something, and it seemed like the […]

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Ursula Le Guin died unexpectedly on Monday, January 22, in the home in Portland, Oregon, where she lived with her husband Charles. After she asked me to be her biographer, several years ago, she and I had many long talks on the phone, met once or twice a year, and corresponded. We talked about my […]

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Sometime between October 9 and 14, 1797—let’s call it the second Monday in October—Samuel Taylor Coleridge, as he was walking on the coast in southwest England, became ill and stopped to rest at a remote farm. An image had been tugging at his attention, from a seventeenth-century traveler’s tale about China. In this unfamiliar house, […]

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